Hong Kong International Finance Centre Building

Within the myriad of skyscrapers and soaring buildings distributed on the islands, the International Finance Centre is the tallest building in Hong Kong. The International Finance Centre, which is branded as “IFC”, is an integrated commercial development on the famous waterfront area of Hong Kong’s Central District.

To be the tallest building in Hong Kong is of course, an international prestige, and the sheer size and height makes it a very prominent landmark on the Island. The International Finance Centre boasts of grandeur and splendor as it stands out from all the other tall buildings in the city.

IFC basically consists of two skyscrapers. Tower One consists of the IFC mall and the forty-storey Four Seasons Hotel Hong Kong. The 88 storey Tower Two International Finance Centre is the tallest building in Hong Kong, usurping the place that was once occupied by the infamous Central Plaza.

The complex was developed by a consortium lead by Sun Hung Kai Properties & MTR Corporation. In addition, the Airport Express Station Central is directly beneath it, providing more convenient transportation especially for traveling businessmen.

The One International Finance Centre was completed in 1998 and opened in 1999. Its height is 210 meters, has a 38-storey building with a four-floor trading, 18 high speed passenger lifts in 4 zones, and comprises 784,000 square feet, or approximately 72,850 square meters. The building currently accommodates approximately 5,000 people.

Of the two skyscrapers that make up the International Finance Center building, the Two International Finance Centre is the tallest building in the city. It was designed by Cesar Pelli and completed in 2003. Its height measures approximately at 415 meters. It has 88 storeys, which is an extremely auspicious number for the Cantonese culture.

True to its name it contains twenty-two high-ceiling trading floors. The Monetary Authority (HKMA) is located at the 55th floor. The whole complex is equipped with state of the art telecommunications, raised floors for flexible cabling management, and nearly column-free floor plans. The building expects to accommodate up to 15,000 people, when all offices and floors are fully occupied.

Due to Cantonese culture and beliefs, the 88 storeys of the building may not be exactly eighty-eight (88). Why? Because of superstitious reasons, “taboo floors” like 14 and 24 are omitted because these numbers, according to Cantonese culture, sound like “definitely die” and “easy to die” respectively.

The top floor of the Two IFC is only slightly higher than Hong Kong city’s landmark, the Peak. Two IFC is the third tallest building in the Greater China region and the 6th tallest office building in the world.

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